What & Why of Tallow

Tallow is rendered animal fat. It is a beautiful golden oil which has many traditional uses from cooking and candle making to healing weathered, irritated skin. Our fat is sourced from ORGANIC 100% grass-fed, pastured-raised cows. The cows' clean diets give our tallow its maximum nutrient content. Our cows are KARMIC! They are raised free from anti-biotics and hormones and are humanely treated (Animal Welfare Approved, AMA papers available) .

Tallow is a "throwback" skin care tool. Eight out of ten traditional skin care recipes from the 19th century contain tallow.2 The word "tallow" is derived from the latin word "sebum." Sebum is an oily waxy lipid (fat) that lubricates and waterproofs our skin.1 Tallow’s fatty acid profile of 50-55% saturated fat is similar to human cell membranes and skin sebum.1 

Tallow is readily absorbed by the skin because it is literally recognized as food.

Commercial skin care ingredients replace your skin's natural oils leaving you with the illusion of moisture replenishment. Tallow does the opposite...

Tallow Nourishes with:

  • fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, ONLY available in animal fats1  
  • conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) which has anti-cancer3,4 (WOW, right?!) and anti-inflammatory6 properties 
  • palmitoleic acid5 which has anti-microbial6 properties (fights imbalances- think acne!)
  • omega 3 & 6 & 7& 9 which plump the skin
  • Stearic fatty acid lubricates 

Tallow Heals:

  • inflammation- eczema (infant to adult), dermatitis, psoriasis, keratosis pilaris, rosacea, rashes, poison oak/ivy, acne
  • chicken skin (e.g. back of arms)
  • stretch marks, cellulite, loose skin
  • dry, chapped, calloused, cracked, flaky, sun-damaged skin, and wrinkled skin
  • diaper rash, cradle cap, baby acne
  • nail/cuticle trouble, calloused feet
  • sunburns
  • scars  

Tallow is unparalleled in its ability to nourish and heal skin.

1. Gardener, Andrew J. "Traditional Nourishing and Healing Skin Care. " (http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/traditional-nourishing-and-healing-skin-care/)

2. Gardener, Andrew J. "Traditional Nourishing and Healing Skin Care. " (http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/traditional-nourishing-and-healing-skin-care/) citing: Chase, Alvin Wood, M.D. (1866). Dr. Chase’s Recpies; or Information for Everybody, 33rd edition. Published by the author, Ann Arbor: 110-112, 162-163.

3. Gardener, Andrew J. "Traditional Nourishing and Healing Skin Care. " (http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/traditional-nourishing-and-healing-skin-care/) citing: Ip, C, J.A. Scimeca, et al. (1994). “Conjugated linoleic acid. A powerful anti-carcinogen from animal fat sources.” Cancer 74(3 suppl):1050-4.

4. Gardener, Andrew J. "Traditional Nourishing and Healing Skin Care. " (http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/traditional-nourishing-and-healing-skin-care/) citing: Enig, Mary G., PhD (Winter 2007). Wise Traditions in Food, Farming and the Healing Arts. “Some Recent Studies on Fats.” 

5. Gardener, Andrew J. "Traditional Nourishing and Healing Skin Care. " (http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/traditional-nourishing-and-healing-skin-care/) citing: Enig, Mary G., PhD (Winter 2007). Wise Traditions in Food, Farming and the Healing Arts. “Some Recent Studies on Fats.”

6. Fallon, Sally & Mary G. Enig (2001). Nourishing Traditions. NewTrends Publishing, Inc., Washington: 19.